The best running shoes for women share the same class-leading features with the best shoes overall—they’re light, comfortable, cushioned, and just supportive enough where you need it most. But that locus of support is where some of the biggest differences between men’s and women’s running shoes can be found. Check out quick reviews below of five of our top picks, or scroll deeper for more in-depth reviews of these and other options, plus buying advice.
Researchers have also found that because women tend to have wider hips than men, our feet are more likely to strike the ground toward the outside of our shoe soles. The inward rolling of the foot that results from this is known as pronation, which explains why more women are believed to overpronate than men. Some women’s running shoes account for this increased tendency with different materials used for support through the sole.

First off, you should be interval training in a lightweight shoe to help you gain distance and endurance. However, for the 5K itself, you’re going to want a pair of running shoes that have a little more stability and cushioning, even if it means that they are slightly heavier. If you feel that you’re transitioning to more serious running, you must consider having a solid rotation of running shoes instead of just one. Remember that all cushioning (gel, foam, composites) require some time to recover from being used.
WE added four new stellar options to our 10 Best Women’s running shoes. Eachone offers a little individuality based off preference while still offering all the great comfort and stability of a great running shoe. Our newest adds are the Brooks Adrenaline GTS 10, New Balance 890v6, Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 35, and the Altra Intuition 4.5. Scroll through and get better informed on what makes these and our hole list the best. Each option offers everything you will need to hit the road running in style and comfort. Our FAQs and Criteria will help you along with your search as well and give you a better idea of what best fits your needs..

If you need shoes for short distances i.e. shoes for light walks, not a noticeable difference. However, this guide is focusing on footwear for women, and the fact is that women’s bodies are much different from men’s. Shoe companies understand that women represented 58% of all the 5k races in the US last year, and providing options that are tailored to their needs is important. Significant feedback has shown that when shoe manufacturers take the differences in biomechanics and physiological composition into consideration with their design, it provides women with a better performing shoe.
Every runner deserves a solid, durable sports shoe and the most durable ones are constructed from the ground up. To determine the overall durability of a shoe we took a look at the outsole, midsole, and upper constructions. Durable running shoes for women have an outsole made of materials that will hold up to outdoor elements, rugged terrain, and are capable of withstanding hard impacts.  Midsoles need to maintain a solid level of comfort, even when miles begin to pile up. The upper portion of the shoe should also be breathable AND made of strongly constructed materials. It’s crucial to us that we listen to what female runners from all walks of life had to say in regards to how much wear and tear their shoes could take after they’ve put several miles on them--this way we could provide you with the most accurate information in regards to durability.
A perennial favorite for new runners and marathon maniacs alike, the Ghost has always provided a quick, smooth ride that holds up over the miles. This year’s edition somehow raises an already-stellar bar with a new 3D Fit Print upper that promises a lighter feel and sleeker aesthetic. While our testers thought the Ghost 11 had ample cushioning in the heel, they felt it could use a little more softness up front—and Brooks listened; our RW Lab data showed there is indeed softer cushioning in the forefoot of the 12. “From front to back, the cushioning is superb without being too mushy,” said one female tester. “The forefoot was cushioned enough to provide a soft landing while also letting me feel the terrain beneath me.”
For a responsive midsole and lightweight, springy ride with excellent energy return, you don’t have to spend a fortune—these Floatrides cost $100 (or even less, when you can snag a deal). Some of our testers described the shoes as feeling like “fast slippers,” with a comfy fit and a solid performance at everything from distance to threshold pace. In the first version, we just had one complaint about the shoe—the traditional lacing system didn’t hold the tongue in place mid-run. However, the 2 has improved the upper to reduce any sliding.
Running all winter takes a lot—extra motivation, tireless dedication, and in the worst conditions, the right pair of shoes. The ICE+ makes it easier to get out there on days that would otherwise confine you to the treadmill with a Vibram Arctic Grip outsole that can grab ice without tearing up bare roads like a spiked sole would. Overall, the neutral shoe’s fit is comfortable, with a flexible overall ride and extra cushioning in the forefoot, plus a heel fit praised by women on our test team for how well it locks the heel into place. A water-resistant upper fends off the snow, even when you’re breaking new trail. But for summer trail runs, the regular Saucony Peregrine is equally capable, bringing the same deep, lugged outsole and cushioned platform to a shoe with a more breathable upper.
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