With this newest update, we have added three new shoes to our list including some shoes in our top ranking positions. Be sure to check out the newly added products- ASICS Women's GEL-Venture 5, Salomon Women's XR Mission, and Adidas Women's Cloudfoam QT. If you have any questions about these or the other running shoes featured on our guide, feel free to reach out to us and let us answer those queries and help you find the running shoes that are just right for you!
With this newest update, we have added three new shoes to our list including some shoes in our top ranking positions. Be sure to check out the newly added products- ASICS Women's GEL-Venture 5, Salomon Women's XR Mission, and Adidas Women's Cloudfoam QT. If you have any questions about these or the other running shoes featured on our guide, feel free to reach out to us and let us answer those queries and help you find the running shoes that are just right for you!

First off, women’s shoes share a few features based on characteristics that may or may not apply to you. It’s possible you might prefer a “men’s” shoe, just as some men might feel more comfortable in a “women’s” shoe. The designs of the shoes are just based on general group tendencies—such as that women have less muscle mass than men and tend to weigh less as a result. For this reason, women’s shoes often have a lighter and softer midsole to make up for the lower degree of impact put on the shoe with each stride.
In general, women tend to have 15% lower body mass than men, this means shoes must have a deeper groove that can provide greater flexibility, which, translates to a smooth and natural toe-off motion through the running patterns of the foot. Seasoned runners agree that a little less foam in the overall cushioning of a running shoe goes a long way for female runners.

Researchers have also found that because women tend to have wider hips than men, our feet are more likely to strike the ground toward the outside of our shoe soles. The inward rolling of the foot that results from this is known as pronation, which explains why more women are believed to overpronate than men. Some women’s running shoes account for this increased tendency with different materials used for support through the sole.
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