Researchers have also found that because women tend to have wider hips than men, our feet are more likely to strike the ground toward the outside of our shoe soles. The inward rolling of the foot that results from this is known as pronation, which explains why more women are believed to overpronate than men. Some women’s running shoes account for this increased tendency with different materials used for support through the sole. 

The Turbo 2 is built for women who want to go fast, with a soft, springy ZoomX foam in the midsole borrowed from the record-setting Vaporfly Flyknit 4%. Typically, an EVA foam midsole will compress easily and then take its sweet time recovering shape. But ZoomX technology has blown us away with its quick compressibility and immediate rebound. Nike has added a thin layer of React foam to the bottom so the shoe will hold up for longer, as well as a rubber outsole grid for traction. Overall, this is a high-mileage, versatile shoe that combines the fit and feel of a workhorse Pegasus with the lightweight speed of a racing flat. Just be warned that upper feels slightly less secure than the first Peg Turbo.
Mizuno completely redesigned the brand’s midsoles this year with a dual layer of foam in the shape of a wave, plus a full-length third foam level for even more cushioning. In the case of the Waveknit 3, the result is a shoe that feels softer, bouncier, and less stiff—without losing the smooth-riding qualities we’ve loved in Mizunos of yore. A more flexible knit Waveknit upper provides a snug fit with better stretch in the toebox than the Waveknit 2’s mesh upper. The durable rubber outsole is largely unchanged, adding up to a cushioned-but-firm trainer that will float you through your daily mileage.
While you might be able to find your favorite brand and style (like New Balance Minimus shoes), you probably won't be able to fully customize it to match your running style and foot shape. How you run and the surface you prefer to run on plays a critical role in the ideal design of your shoe. The impact on someone's feet varies from place to place. If you underpronate (rolling your foot slightly outward), you'll need lighter, more flexible cushioning for shock absorption on the bottom of your feet. We can customize Hoka running shoes, ASICS sneakers for women, Saucony running shoes, and everything else you see in our inventory with the proper insert. If you don't already know your preferences, come to one of our locations where we can analyze how you run and give you the exact shoe, soul, and insert you need to keep your body injury free after every marathon.

The women’s casual driving moc is a true Twisted X original! Handcrafted in genuine full-grain leather, the driving moc makes an unforgettable statement about true comfort and style in casual footwear. Blending together a traditional open-laced profile, moc toe design, and integrated comfort technology that provides timeless quality and style. The SD footbed, composite XD insole, and the Twisted X driving moc outsole combine to produce one of the most comfortable, ankle-high casual shoes you can find. From a relaxing stroll to spending the entire day on your feet, our driving mocs will have you redefining comfort.
When picking the right clothing and shoes for women, sometimes the brand makes a difference. That's why you'll find a great selection of the best names and styles in women's shoes and clothing, whether it's women's slip-ons from Skechers, The North Face jackets, OluKai flip-flops, Levi's jeans, Converse sneakers, Under Armour hoodies, or UGG slippers. Going for a more formal look? Shop Naturalizer pumps, Sam Edelman heels, Vionic slingbacks, and much more.
For a responsive midsole and lightweight, springy ride with excellent energy return, you don’t have to spend a fortune—these Floatrides cost $100 (or even less, when you can snag a deal). Some of our testers described the shoes as feeling like “fast slippers,” with a comfy fit and a solid performance at everything from distance to threshold pace. In the first version, we just had one complaint about the shoe—the traditional lacing system didn’t hold the tongue in place mid-run. However, the 2 has improved the upper to reduce any sliding.
Researchers have also found that because women tend to have wider hips than men, our feet are more likely to strike the ground toward the outside of our shoe soles. The inward rolling of the foot that results from this is known as pronation, which explains why more women are believed to overpronate than men. Some women’s running shoes account for this increased tendency with different materials used for support through the sole.
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